Author Topic: Theater of War  (Read 200 times)

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  • KRIEGS - SCHAUPLATZ
    (Theater of War)

    No Date (1914) Cast bronze uniface medal, 79.0mm, 122.8g., Edge stamp: C.POELLATH SCHROBENH.  Ernsting WVZ 55
    Henry Scott Goodman Collection

    The large, flat exergue forming the foreground is thick at the bottom and descends towards the slightly raised border.  The image motif is sculpturally raised.
       

    Scenic sequence from left to right: a densely packed group of people, including women, looks up at the drummer in tails and top hat, acting on a stage constructed of wooden beams festooned with garlands, draperies, and a canopy; to the right of the curtain, raised by a monkey in costume and lifted by a rope, a uniformed man with lance and a turban-like headgear descends from the stand to join other marching men to the right.  Above the show booth, a banner with the inscription KRIEGS - SCHAUPLATZ raised on a crossbar; in the exergue a recessed L.G. is inscribed.  Edge stamp: C.POELLATH SCHROBENH.

    Number in Museum Collections: 5

    Brüssel, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, Albert I Penningkabinett (Royal Library)
    Dresden, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen (State Art Collection)
    London, British Museum, Department of Coins and Medals
    New York, American Numismatic Society
    Vienna, Kunsthistoriches Museum (Art History Museum)


    Number known in Private Collection: 2

    Provenance: Ex-Steve Pellegrini Collection


    ICONOGRAPHY
    According to Ernsting Bernhart's interpretation of the image, which was handed down in 1914, is only binding to a limited extent: On the one hand, iconographic features such as the costume of the civilian population listening on the left speak against a secure identification of the group of people with Indians.  On the other hand, none of the works created in 1914 in this series context is to be understood as a concrete, contemporary historical illustration.  However, since the piece was also shown in exhibitions under the title “Indians” and Bernhart was also personally known to Gies, there is still the possibility that the artistic imagination was inflamed by the events of the day, without wanting to make them the subject of the medal in a reportage or even satirical sense.  Together with WVZ 56 to WVZ 62, this work was created as one piece within a series of eight, probably from December 1914.
Theater of War
« on: May 13, 2020, 11:49:53 AM »

KRIEGS - SCHAUPLATZ
(Theater of War)

No Date (1914) Cast bronze uniface medal, 79.0mm, 122.8g., Edge stamp: C.POELLATH SCHROBENH.  Ernsting WVZ 55
Henry Scott Goodman Collection

The large, flat exergue forming the foreground is thick at the bottom and descends towards the slightly raised border.  The image motif is sculpturally raised.
   

Scenic sequence from left to right: a densely packed group of people, including women, looks up at the drummer in tails and top hat, acting on a stage constructed of wooden beams festooned with garlands, draperies, and a canopy; to the right of the curtain, raised by a monkey in costume and lifted by a rope, a uniformed man with lance and a turban-like headgear descends from the stand to join other marching men to the right.  Above the show booth, a banner with the inscription KRIEGS - SCHAUPLATZ raised on a crossbar; in the exergue a recessed L.G. is inscribed.  Edge stamp: C.POELLATH SCHROBENH.

Number in Museum Collections: 5

Brüssel, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, Albert I Penningkabinett (Royal Library)
Dresden, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen (State Art Collection)
London, British Museum, Department of Coins and Medals
New York, American Numismatic Society
Vienna, Kunsthistoriches Museum (Art History Museum)


Number known in Private Collection: 2

Provenance: Ex-Steve Pellegrini Collection


ICONOGRAPHY
According to Ernsting Bernhart's interpretation of the image, which was handed down in 1914, is only binding to a limited extent: On the one hand, iconographic features such as the costume of the civilian population listening on the left speak against a secure identification of the group of people with Indians.  On the other hand, none of the works created in 1914 in this series context is to be understood as a concrete, contemporary historical illustration.  However, since the piece was also shown in exhibitions under the title “Indians” and Bernhart was also personally known to Gies, there is still the possibility that the artistic imagination was inflamed by the events of the day, without wanting to make them the subject of the medal in a reportage or even satirical sense.  Together with WVZ 56 to WVZ 62, this work was created as one piece within a series of eight, probably from December 1914.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2020, 08:37:20 PM by Henry Scott Goodman »