Author Topic: God is with us  (Read 89 times)

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  • Karl Ott.  1914. 

    GOTT ——  MIT UNS ● (God is with us).  Single-sided cast bronze, medium-brown patina, 75 mm, 65.51 g.  Edge-punch C.POELLATH   —   SCHROBENH..  Vorzüglich (extremely fine).

    A lightly-armored knight on horseback, bare-headed, hands clasped in prayer, rides to left over a multi-headed, coiling hydra stretched beneath the horse's hooves; title legend upper edge; two-line inscription A・D / 1914 center left; artist's signature K・OTT in exergue; pearled edge, raised rim.

    Cf: Bernhart, Max.  1915.  Kriegsmedaillen bayerischer Künstler, pl. XVII: 90.

    Cf: Bernhart, Max.  1917.  Die Münchener Medaillenkunst der Gegenwart, pl. 37, no. 265.

    Cf: Frankenhuis, M.  1919(?).  Catalogue of Medals - Medalets and Plaques Relative to the World War 1914 - 1919, p. 80: 601.

    Cf: Klose, Dietrich O. A. 2016.  Europas Verderben 1914 1918: Deutsche und österreichische Medaillen auf den Ersten Weltkrieg, p. 118: 9.1.


    A hydra representing Germany's and Austria-Hungary's multiple enemies facing a mythical or Medieval hero became a widespread trope of graphic and medallic art in 1914.  On examples such as this one, the individual hydra heads are characterized by caricatured representatives of the the Allied Powers, e.g. a bear for Russia, a rooster for France, a bulldog for Britain.
God is with us
« on: December 21, 2019, 12:00:55 PM »

Karl Ott.  1914. 

GOTT ——  MIT UNS ● (God is with us).  Single-sided cast bronze, medium-brown patina, 75 mm, 65.51 g.  Edge-punch C.POELLATH   —   SCHROBENH..  Vorzüglich (extremely fine).

A lightly-armored knight on horseback, bare-headed, hands clasped in prayer, rides to left over a multi-headed, coiling hydra stretched beneath the horse's hooves; title legend upper edge; two-line inscription A・D / 1914 center left; artist's signature K・OTT in exergue; pearled edge, raised rim.

Cf: Bernhart, Max.  1915.  Kriegsmedaillen bayerischer Künstler, pl. XVII: 90.

Cf: Bernhart, Max.  1917.  Die Münchener Medaillenkunst der Gegenwart, pl. 37, no. 265.

Cf: Frankenhuis, M.  1919(?).  Catalogue of Medals - Medalets and Plaques Relative to the World War 1914 - 1919, p. 80: 601.

Cf: Klose, Dietrich O. A. 2016.  Europas Verderben 1914 1918: Deutsche und österreichische Medaillen auf den Ersten Weltkrieg, p. 118: 9.1.


A hydra representing Germany's and Austria-Hungary's multiple enemies facing a mythical or Medieval hero became a widespread trope of graphic and medallic art in 1914.  On examples such as this one, the individual hydra heads are characterized by caricatured representatives of the the Allied Powers, e.g. a bear for Russia, a rooster for France, a bulldog for Britain.
« Last Edit: December 21, 2019, 09:24:16 PM by Haarmann »